Now You See It, Now You Don’t

Hacker trying to hack into phoneStand against the wall. That’s the common advice given to tourists when they start to make calls on their smartphones in foreign lands. It’s not the roaming charges you have to look out for any longer. It’s now the roaming thieves who want to steal your phone in broad daylight and compound the pain by phishing your account information to unlock, wipe, and resell the phone. By standing against the wall, you limit the access and cover your blind side. Sadly, the stories are anything but rare.

Bait And Switch

The phishing scheme is often deployed long after you’ve replaced the phone, according to a recent Krebs On Security brief. Given the success with Apple products, they’ve even tagged the exploit iPhishing. The strategy relies on simple correlation between a user’s phone and their iCould credentials. The same info you use to access Find My Phone are phished out using emails and texts that alert you to activity in your account. In responding to that alert, you actually create the activity. Ironically, one of the lowest-tech forms of intrusion is used to penetrate your cloud and sell your stolen smartphone.

Commercial Phish Catching With No Release

How many of your employees have smartphones? Don’t answer that. The number will scare you. Phishing is low-tech because it’s low-cost. Your employees already feel vulnerable because their phones were stolen or they’ve heard the stories. An email that looks a lot like an official Apple email and carries a sense of urgency can go a long way in a matter of seconds.

ICS has the right net for the job. Let us filet and plate the threats before they even swim your way. It’s what we do.

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